Day-1= Pickup from arrival @ Mysore Railway Station / Buss Station. Transfer to a hotel, after Refresh and Breakfast proceed to Ranganthaswamy temple,Tippu Sultan Summer Palace,Sharvanabelogola Temple, Melukote Cheluvarayaswamy Temple

Day-2=After Breakfast Proceed to Mullayanagiri Peak Point,Baba Budangiri Mountain,Rathnagiri,Drop to Hotel

Day-3=After Breakfast Proceed to Hebbe waterfalls,kallathigiri Falls,Belur Chennakeshava Temple,Halebidu Hoysaleshwara Temple,and end tour proceed to Mysore City…

Mullayanagiri, located at a distance of 16 Km from Chikmagalur is a part of the Baba Budan Giri Hill ranges. Mullayanagiri stands 1930 meters tall rewarded as the tallest peak in Karnataka state. Enroute, you can see Sitalayanagiri where the water inside the Shiva temple neither raises nor decreases. The way to Mullayanagiri is very narrow that has a views from steep cliffs. Driving towards the peak is not possible and you will have to trek up the hill from the mid way point. There’s a small temple located on top of the hill. From the highest point of the hill, you can view Arabian Sea on clear days. The small hillock in the temple compound is the highest point in Karnataka. The narrow road to the temple makes two way traffic impossible. It is a great trekking spot in Karnataka.

A downhill trek of about 8 km from Raj Bhavan takes one to Hebbe Falls where water streams down from a height of 168 meters in two stages to form Dodda Hebbe (Big Falls) and Chikka Hebbe (Small Falls). Located inside a coffee estate the view is mesmerizing and a must see when in the area! If you do not wish to walk you could even reach by car.

Bahubali was the son of Rishabha (first tirthankara and founder of Jainism). Bahubali is a much revered figure among Jains. After the nonviolent duel with Bharata, his elder brother, Bahubali abandoned his kingdom and clothes to became a Jain monk.Bahubali meditated motionless for a whole year in kayotsarga posture because of which climbers grew around his legs. After one year of meditation, Bahubali attained omniscience (kevala jnana). According to Jain texts, Bahubali attained moksha (liberation from the cycle of births and deaths) at mount Kailasa and became a Siddha (liberated soul).
Bahubali is also called Gommatesh because of the statue dedicated to him. “Gommateshwara” statue, built by the Ganga dynasty minister and commander Chamundaraya, is a 57-foot (17 m) monolith (statue carved from a single piece of rock) and is situated above a hill in Shravanabelagola, in the Hassan district of Karnataka state, India. It was built in around 983 A.D. and is one of the largest free standing statues in the world. On August 5, 2007, the statue was voted by Indians as the first of Seven Wonders of India; 49% of the total votes went in favor of it.
According to Jain texts, when Rishabhdeva decided to become a monk he distributed his kingdom into his 100 sons, of whom Bharata got the city of Vinita (Ayodhya) and Bahubali got the city of Podanapur (Taxila). After returning from the world conquest, Bharata demanded submission from his own brothers. Bahubali defied Bharata and challenged him for a fight.

The Ranganthaswamy temple (usually referred to as “Sri Ranganathaswamy”) in Srirangapatina, in the Mandya district of Karnataka state, India, is dedicated to the Hindu god Ranganatha (a manifestation of the god Vishnu). It is one of the five important pilgrimage sites along the river Kaveri for devotees of Ranganatha. These five sacred sites are together known as Pancharanga Kshetrams in Southern India. Since Srirangapatna is the first temple starting from upstream, the deity is known as Adi Ranga (lit; “first Ranga”) The town of Srirangapatna, which derives its name from the temple, is located on an island in the river Kaveri.
According to the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), the temple is one of considerable antiquity. An inscription at the temple reveals it was first consecrated in 894 A.D. by a local chief called Tirumalaiah, a vassal of the Western Ganga dynasty. In early 12th century, Hoysala King Vishnuvardhana (r.1108-1152) granted the village of Srirangapatna to the Vaishnava saint Ramanujacharya as an agraharam (place of learning). An inscription of the great Hoysala King Veera Ballala II (1210 A.D.) confirms that additions and renovations were made to the temple at that time. The tower over the entrance bears features consistent with Vijayanagara architecture. According to historian George Michell, contributions were also made by the Wodeyar kings of the Kingdom of Mysore. The temple is protected by the Archaeological Survey of India as a monument of national importance.