DAY-1= Pickup from arrival @ Mysore Railway Station / Buss Station. Transfer to a hotel, after Refresh and Breakfast  proceed to  Bylguppe(Golden Temple,Tibets are Located area),Kavery Nisargadhama,Dubare Forest(River Wrafting),Omkareshwara Temple,Shopping Over Night Stay @ Madicari.

Day-2=After Morning Breakfast Visit Talakavery(Kavery Birth Place),Bhagamandala(Sangama Temple),Raja Seat(View Sun Set Point),Coorg Fort,Abbey Falls.After Transfer to Mysore to catch the Train/Buss Onwards Journey.

Abby Falls or the Abbi Water Falls is situated just 7-8 kilometers from Madikeri town [Galibeedu road]. ‘Abbi’ in coorgie means a waterfall . The British called it the Jessie waterfalls in memory of Jessie the daughter of Madikeri’s first captain. It is located in a private property and decently maintained. Abby cascades 70 ft down to flow as a small river .The falls appear suddenly, the water cascading over rocks into calm pools. A path through coffee and cardamom plantation off the main road adds to the attraction of the falls. Enjoy the gushing, roaring beauty but a desire to take a dip in the cool waters may prove to be risky. Reaching the place is a nice ride in itself as the road that drives you is very narrow with lots of turns and twists, ups and downs a two wheeler ride would be JOLLY one. A nature welcomes you at every turn .The route to this Falls one Has to go through private Coffee estates. The Foggy Spray issuing forth from the stream flowing over a precipe makes a spectacular sight when viewed from a convenient spot. The water flow is very high during the monsoon season and during the dry seasons the flow is considerably less. The falls is more enjoyable within the fenced area wherefrom you get its friendly pose for your camera. A hanging bridge has now been built across the gorge here offering a good view of the falls. The best time to visit is early winter when the monsoons bring plenty of water. Do take Immense care at this falls as adventure [crazy] stuffs in the falls has always led to a sorrow ending..

Omkareshwara Temple in Coorg is a Shiva temple built by King Lingarajendra II in the year 1820. It is said that the temple was constructed by the king to appease the soul of a Brahmin, whom he killed for political reasons. The soul of the Brahmin was then possessed by evil spirits in order to take revenge for the king’s cruelty. To tame the evil spirit, Brahmarakshasa, the king brought a Shivalingam from the holy place of Kashi and installed it at the newly constructed temple. And, thus, this particular Shivalingam came to be known as Omkareshwara.

​ The architecture of the temple is an amalgamation of Islamic and Gothic style. In the centre of the structure, there is a dome and four turrets surround this dome. At the entrance of the temple, you will find a copper plate, which has the history of the temple inscribed on it. And before you enter the temple, you will find a beautiful pool with lots of fish in it, adding to the aura of natural beauty and serenity here

Bhagamandala is situated at the confluence of two rivers, the Kaveri and the Kanika. A third river, the Sujyothi is said to join from underground. It is considered sacred as a river confluence (kudala or sangama, in Kannada and Sanskrit). The temple here, built in Kerala style, has smaller shrines dedicated to various gods.
It is a common practice for pilgrims to take a dip in the sangama and perform rituals to their ancestors before proceeding to Talakaveri, the birthplace of Kaveri. During Tula Sankramana which falls on October 17 or 18.
A short distance from the sangama, there is a famous temple known as Sri Bhagandeshwara temple, where Bhagandeshwara (Ishwara), Subramanya, Mahavishnu and Ganapati are installed. Thus this is also known as Bhagundeshwara Kshetra, from which the name Bhagamandala is derived.
The area was occupied by Tipu Sultan during 1785-1790 and renamed Bhagamandala to Afesalabad. Then in 1790 King Dodda Vira Rajendra took Bhagamandala back into an independent Kodagu.
Bhagamandala is located about 33 km from Madikeri. Government and private buses are made available to this place frequently.

The Nagarahole National Park, also known as the Rajiv Gandhi National Park, was set up as a wildlife sanctuary in 1955 and later christened as a national park in the year 1988. The park stretches for over 643 sq km between the Kodagu (Coorg) district and Mysore district in the southern state of Karnataka.
Together with the Bandipur National Park (870 sq km), the Mudumalai National Park (320 sq km), and the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary (344 sq km), it forms one of the largest protected areas for wildlife in Southern India. The park is also a part of the Nilgiris Biosphere Reserve, and is being considered by the UNESCO for selection as a World Heritage Site along with the Western Ghats.
The Nagarahole National Park derives its name from two Kannada words ‘Naga’ meaning ‘snake’ and ‘Hole’ meaning ‘stream’. The Kabini River separates the Nagarahole National Park from the Bandipur National Park. Besides the Kabini, there are other rivers flowing in the vicinity of the park and these are the Lakshmana and Teentha rivers. The park is dotted with enchanting greenery and forest cover, coupled with waterfalls and a wide array of wildlife.
Due to high levels of rainfall in this region, the park consists of numerous open grassy swamps lined with teak and eucalyptus. Wildlife varieties are numerous in number. Some of the common predators that can be seen include tigers, leopards, sloth bears and wild dogs. Spotted deer, sambar, barking deer, four-horned antelopes, wild boars and elephants constitute the herbivores.
Elephants in particular are seen the most, and they can be spotted enjoying their natural habitat at its best.
Other mammals present include the common langur, Bonnet macaques, jungle cats, slender Loris, leopards, civet cats, mongoose, common otters, giant flying squirrels, giant squirrels, porcupines, jackals, mouse-deer, hares and pangolins. The park also has a wide variety of birds and amphibians.